Category Archives: South Carolina

Death penalty process will become secret if South Carolina’s governor gets his way

If South Carolina doesn’t pass a law to keep the drugs it uses for lethal injections a secret, the state won’t be able to carry out its first execution in six years on Dec. 1. Or at least that’s what South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster spent the week telling state lawmakers. . . .

There’s just one problem: The scheduled execution of Bobby Stone, 52, on Dec. 1 was never going to happen because a federal court hasn’t reviewed his case yet. McMaster and Sterling created a false sense of urgency to publicly call for a law that would make much of the death penalty procedure in South Carolina a secret. Stone’s execution was stayed — as expected — on Tuesday.
Continue reading: Vice

Overturned S.C. Sentence Tracks with Decline of Death Penalty

William Henry Bell was convicted of the murder of Dennis Hepler in 1989. The jury handed down a death sentence. Now, after almost 30 years, Bell has left his cell on death row after a decades-long effort to vacate Bell’s execution ended with the attorney general exhausting the state’s appeals process.

The vacated sentence underscores the continuing decline of the death penalty in the U.S.

Continue reading: Free Times

Amnesty Charleston: Urgent: Stop Arkansas’ rush to execute 8 people in 10 days

Arkansas hasn’t had an execution in 12 years, so why the sudden rush? Simple: their lethal injection drugs are about to expire.

Arkansas has exactly eight doses left of a crucial drug used to perform lethal injections, and it’s set to expire at the end of April. So the governor scheduled eight executions packed into a ten day period — with two executions per day — as if the justice system was a conveyor belt. Take Action Continue reading

From firing squads to gas, legislators explore ways to execute death row inmates in absence of lethal drugs

(source: thestate.com)

South Carolina has no way of executing its more than 30 death row inmates, and state legislators are exploring how to fix that.

A Senate panel discussed Thursday looking into alternatives to lethal injection, the method the state most commonly used until the last set of drugs expired in 2013. Since then, the state has had no way of executing any of the 38 inmates on death row unless they choose to die by electrocution. Continue reading

Arrests Expected at U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, DC on 40th Anniversary of First Execution

Abolitionist Action Committee press release

Activists call on Nation to End the Death Penalty as State Executions hit Historic Lows

Members of the anti-death penalty Abolitionist Action Committee (AAC) and many faith leaders will stage a highly visual demonstration at the U.S. Supreme Court in the 10:00 am hour, Tuesday, January 17 to mark the 40th anniversary of the 1st execution under contemporary laws. A program featuring death row exonerees, murder victim family members and others, will take place the evening before. Continue reading

Even Dylann Roof should not receive a death sentence

A Charleston, S.C., jury convicted racist murderer Dylann Roof of hate crimes last month, and now the only question is whether the state will put him to death. We oppose the death penalty even for the Dylann Roofs of the world. But if the jury disagrees with us, at least it would hand down the ultimate punishment in retribution for a truly unusual crime and without a shadow of doubt about Mr. Roof’s guilt.
Read more: Washington Post editorial

Rev. Barber: We Have Convicted White Supremacist Dylann Roof But America is Still Guilty

Guests—-Rev. Dr. William Barber, president of Repairers of the Breach and head of the North Carolina NAACP.

. . . And while Dylann Roof has been found guilty, lastly, Amy, South Carolina is still guilty. South Carolina, after those 9 deaths – you know, my frat brother, Reverend Pinckney, was killed. He fought for more money for public education. The South Carolina Legislature has not passed more money for public education in his name. He fought against voter suppression. Nikki Haley supported voter suppression. And now she’s going to be an ambassador to other nations. He fought for the pulling down of the Confederate flag. The flag did not come down until 9 people were killed, which, in an eerie way, sends the signal that only black death matters. You know, he fought for a living wage. He fought for healthcare expansion that would help black and poor white people in South Carolina. South Carolina is still guilty of not expanding healthcare and not raising their living wage and still having right-to-work laws, which are actually right-to-discriminate laws that keep labor unions out of the South. . . .
Read the interview: Democracy Now

Life Requires More From Us Than Death: Ending The Death Penalty In Charleston, Too

. . . For the first peoples of this land, communities of African descent, other communities of color and poor people, news about America the violent is not really news at all. Ours is a different recognition grounded in a historic set of oppressions established through searing social custom, legislative fiat, religious teachings, and racial taxonomies. Enslavement, segregation, discrimination, criminalization, removal, poverty, second-class citizenship, and all manner of brutality and violation are its legacy. It is a legacy that continues still, nowhere more prominently than in the continued administration of the death penalty. . . . Read more

(source: Alton B. Pollard, III, Ph.D.–Dean and Professor of Religion and Culture at Howard University School of Divinity; Henderson Hill Veteran criminal defense and civil rights attorney and trial advocacy instructor based in Charlotte, NC.—-Huffington Post)