‘Very clear line’ between lynching and death penalty

As a co-founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, Bryan Stevenson is a disruptor of chronic injustices who fights for the lives of prisoners on Alabama’s death row.

“[In the U.S.], 156 people exonerated after being sentenced to death. That means for every 10 people that have been executed in the U.S., we’ve identified 1 innocent person on the row, which is a really shameful rate of error,” Stevenson tells The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti.

Life Requires More From Us Than Death: Ending The Death Penalty In Charleston, Too

. . . For the first peoples of this land, communities of African descent, other communities of color and poor people, news about America the violent is not really news at all. Ours is a different recognition grounded in a historic set of oppressions established through searing social custom, legislative fiat, religious teachings, and racial taxonomies. Enslavement, segregation, discrimination, criminalization, removal, poverty, second-class citizenship, and all manner of brutality and violation are its legacy. It is a legacy that continues still, nowhere more prominently than in the continued administration of the death penalty. . . . Read more

(source: Alton B. Pollard, III, Ph.D.–Dean and Professor of Religion and Culture at Howard University School of Divinity; Henderson Hill Veteran criminal defense and civil rights attorney and trial advocacy instructor based in Charlotte, NC.—-Huffington Post)

Report Aims To Explain “Outlier” Counties Imposing Most New Death Sentences

As the death penalty slows across the U.S., some counties continue to impose significant numbers of new death sentences. A report out Tuesday looks at eight key counties — including one in Arizona where 28 death sentences were imposed between 2010 and 2015.
Continue reading: Buzzfeed.com

Also: When A ZIP Code Can Determine A Death Sentence by Kim Bellware, Huffington Post

Dylann Roof’s lawyer a Canadian-born crusader against death penalty

David Bruck, a soft-spoken Montrealer, has become one of America’s foremost opponents of the death penalty.
The memories have faded a little in the 21 years since David Bruck saved her daughter from the electric chair. Linda Russell, mother of South Carolina murderer Susan Smith, now recalls 3 things about him.
How softly he spoke. How intensely he opposed the death penalty. And that photo, on his office wall, of a tiny black boy: George Stinney, a 14-year-old sent to the chair after a flawed trial in 1944.
Continue reading: The Toronto Star