Why Is It So Easy for Prosecutors to Strike Black Jurors?

Last week, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the case of Timothy Tyrone Foster, a black man sentenced to death by an all-white Georgia jury in 1987 for murdering an elderly white woman. Foster claims that the prosecution deliberately eliminated all four eligible black jurors.  The state argues that race played no role in jury selection. It’s an odd argument in light of the evidence that emerged decades after Foster’s conviction: in their notes, the prosecutors highlighted the black jurors’ names in green; circled the answer “black” on the questionnaire where jurors had been asked to identify their race; labelled three black jurors “B#1,” “B#2,” and “B#3”; and identified which person to keep “if we had to pick a black juror.”
Continue reading: The New Yorker

Exonerated death row inmate Glenn Ford seeking donations for medical care

Glenn Ford spent nearly three decades on Angola’s death row for a murder he did not commit. He battled a terminal cancer diagnosis that, according to his federal lawsuit, went needlessly untreated by prison staff. And he challenged the state of Louisiana over its denial of wrongful conviction and imprisonment compensation.
Continue reading: NOLA (The Times-Picayune)

‘Guerrilla War’ Against Lethal Injections?

. . . Still, Gibson sees Alito’s critique as legally irrelevant. “It surely can’t be the case that a drug shortage that results from political speech is less legitimate than one that results from say a problem in the supply chain,” he says. In the article, Gibson depicts the drugmakers’ actions as a response to what he calls the “international moral marketplace.”
Continue reading: Jost on Justice

Piccolo Spoleto THEATRE SERIES: The Exonerated

What effect does it have on an innocent person to have their freedom and self-respect stripped away and then, ostensibly, returned years later after decades of incarceration? Culled from interviews, letters, transcripts, case files and the public record, The Exonerated tells the stories of six wrongfully convicted survivors of death row.  More info/Tickets